Nursing, Sensitivities, and Learning

Nursing, Sensitivities, and Learning

Having a baby opens your eyes to see yourself in all kinds of new ways. For me having a baby also opened my eyes to once again look deeper at issues of health and see my own health in a new light.
When my son was born he had colic. He also reacted to a number of things I ate while nursing. I have read before that babies don’t really react to things that the mother eats, but I definitely disagree with this.
I also have found that since having a baby my sensitivities are back, and although they do not seem to be as bad as they were before, they are much worse than they were when I was pregnant. The thing that has really got me through lately is that my husband and I have started to learn how to do muscle testing. Muscle testing can be difficult and subtle and it is best practiced by a trained professional. My husband and I are not professionals and we do not recommend that anyone attempt to use muscle testing on their own as a form of medical diagnoses. We have however begun to study this a little bit and found it to be a helpful tool for informing us about what things might be causing reactions for me. It has been incredibly helpful to take a little bit of the guess work out of struggling with sensitivities. Now instead of trying desperately to figure out what I ate and what chemicals are in what I ate and what I’m reacting to, I can have my husband do a little muscle testing on me and soon enough we have a really good idea of what caused the problem. Because of this most of the time we have been able to pinpoint what I react to and what my son reacts to in my breast milk.
As a new mom I find myself very aware of what is going on in my little baby – when he has a reaction to something I notice. Sometimes I think I notice reactions in him more quickly or easily then I notice reactions in myself. As I’ve watched my son and struggled to figure out how to best keep him healthy I have learned a lot about how my own reactions work and about health in general. He has been a great motivating factor for me to dig back into health and really look at the unhealthy choices we continued to make in our life even with all that we already knew and all that we had already changed.
So, here’s a little bit about what I’ve learned:

  1. Variety is my friend (and my son’s friend). If I eat something too often I will almost inevitably start reacting to it. There are of course a few exceptions to this – for example we eat potatoes pretty regularly and I’ve never had a problem with them. But, for the most part if I eat something multiple days in a row it will trigger a reaction. For example over Christmas I made a big pot of homemade tomato soup and ate it for one or two meals a day for probably 4 days in a row. By the end of those four days my son was miserable and we figured he must be reacting to something. Yep, he and I both reacted to tomato when we tested it.
  2. If I’m reacting to something going without it for a few weeks will usually allow me to be able to have it again, but I need to be careful not to overdo it. Four weeks after cutting out tomato I wasn’t testing as reacting to it anymore and neither was my son. I have since then had tomato every now and then in small amounts without a problem.
  3. I do not always react to everything that is high in salicylates or other chemicals, but if I do have a reaction to something it will almost always be something that is high in salicylates or other chemicals. For example I’ve been fine with turmeric lately (which is high in salicylate), but I recently had a bad reaction to cinnamon which is also high in salicylates (after eating it in various things two days in a row).
  4. If I react to something then my son will react to it. This was really interesting to me and got me thinking a little bit about why this might be. I’m guessing that he gets my anti-bodies from my breast milk and if I react to something and don’t have anti-bodies for something then he would also not get anti-bodies for something and react to it – does that make sense? It actually got me wondering a little bit if supplementing his nursing with feedings of someone else’s breast milk would help with his reactions…?? I don’t know of anyone willing to donate their breast milk and I do really love nursing my baby myself and haven’t ever given him a bottle or wanted to, but I thought it was an interesting hypothesis. Anyone know anything about this?
  5. Just avoiding the things I react to and avoiding all preservatives, dyes and food additives might not be enough to improve my health. I’ve once again started researching food and how food affects our health and I’ve learning some interesting stuff. I just finished reading Nourishing Traditions and I’ve been spending a good deal of time on the Weston A. Price Foundation’s web site. I thought we ate pretty healthy and well, but I’m realizing that there is a lot more we could do in regards to our eating habits that will help improve our health.

Well, that’s the low down on where I’m at right now. Thanks for letting me share again
Health to you and yours –
Beth

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